Engineer

AfI/IAf #4: “AIs can be artists too” / “Les IAs peuvent aussi être artistes”

These past few years, we’ve had plenty of articles on AIs that had created amazing paintings, incredible texts or uncannily realistic music. While the results were sometimes not as truly unbelievable as the article’s buzz-title suggested, we have to admit that there’s an ever-growing trend of “creative AIs”, or AI artists. But this begs the question: can AI really be creative? Isn’t this ability to invent, to create, inherently human?

Read More »AfI/IAf #4: “AIs can be artists too” / “Les IAs peuvent aussi être artistes”

Why are programming languages different from natural languages?

Natural languages have been around for millennia. They have grown, evolved, spread, split into new ones or disappeared with the people that spoke it… Even though programming languages are much more recent, some are now in their sixties, like C, Lisp or Fortran. Most of the time, we think of developers more as scientific than literary people. But why then are they called programming languages, and not programming sciences? What are the connections and differences between natural and programming languages?

Read More »Why are programming languages different from natural languages?

The “no-code movement”: will programmers be put out of business?

In a way, no-code isn’t a new thing: ever since we’ve added GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces) to our programs, or that we’ve created WYSIWYG (“What You See Is What You Get”) editors, we’ve searched for ways of making the life of programmers easier. Pieces of software like WordPress or IFTTT are different, yet they both have one goal in common: automate some menial tasks to take away the complexity and bring more people to the party.

Read More »The “no-code movement”: will programmers be put out of business?

A peek at IPC and RPC / Coup d’oeil à l’IPC et au RPC

In computer science, we like to run programs. We write lines of codes that take in some input, feed it to a set of gears for computation, and spit out a result. This is hardly news. But what is not clear at first when you’re a programmer in training is all the complexity this sentence hides. To better understand this, let’s talk about washing dishes, doing some shopping and going to the laundry mat.

Read More »A peek at IPC and RPC / Coup d’oeil à l’IPC et au RPC

Why do cheetahs have spots? / Pourquoi les guépards ont-ils des taches ?

In 1952, Alan Turing published an article called The Chemical Basis of Morphogenesis in which he offered an idea as to how reaction-diffusion equations could help explain various biological structures: the spacing of rows of alligator teeth, the spots on cheetahs, the position of leaves on some plants… Beside the article itself that is quite fascinating, it’s interesting to see that today, nearly 70 years later, there is still no scientific consensus on whether to accept or deny his theory.

Read More »Why do cheetahs have spots? / Pourquoi les guépards ont-ils des taches ?